Tag Archives: capital

SKKS I: 5

On the conception of the beginning of spring, composed for a hundred poem sequence for the Lay Priest and former Regent and Chancellor, when he was Minister of the Right.

今日といへば大唐までもゆく春を都にのみと思ひけるかな

kyō to ieba
morokoshi made mo
yuku haru o
miyako ni nomi to
omoikeru kana
On this day, the spring that
Even unto Cathay
Will travel is
In the capital alone
I feel!

Master of the Dowager Empress’ Household Office Shunzei
皇太后宮大夫俊成

GSIS IX: 523

When he had gone to a place called Akashi in Harima to bathe in the sea, he presented this to the Empress’ pantry on a night when the moon was bright.

覺つかな都の空やいかならむ今夜あかしの月を見るにも

obotukana
miyako no sora ya
ikanaramu
koyoFi akasi no
tuki wo miru ni mo
I wonder about
The skies above the capital:
Can
Tonight Akashi’s bright
Moon you see there, too?

Middle Councillor Suketsuna
中納言資綱

GSIS VI: 424

Sent around the end of the Twelfth Month from the province of Bizen to the residence of the Controller of Dewa.

都へは年と共にぞ歸るべきやがて春をもむかへがてらに

miyako Fe Fa
tosi to tomo ni zo
kaFerubeki
yagate Faru wo mo
mukaFe gatera ni
To the capital
Along with the year
I must return;
At last, with the spring
Shall I proceed together!

Minamoto no Tameyoshi
源為善 

MYS XV: 3617

[One of] five poems composed when dropping anchor at Nagadojima in Aki province.

石走る瀧もとどろに鳴く蝉の声をし聞けば都し思ほゆ

ipabasiru
taki mo todoro ni
naku semi no
kowe o si kikeba
miyako si omopoyu
Running o’er the rocks
Cataracts resound –
When the singing cicadas
Song I hear
The capital comes to my thoughts.

Ōishi no Minomaro
大石蓑麻呂

Love V: 30

Left (Tie).
故郷を出でしにまさる涙かな嵐の枕夢に別れて

furusato ni
ideshi ni masaru
namida kana
arashi no makura
yume ni wakarete
My home
I left in floods
Of tears;
The wild wind round my pillow
Breaks us apart in dreams…

Lord Sada’ie
899

Right.
東路の夜半の眺めを語らなん都の山にかゝる月影

azumaji no
yowa no nagame o
kataranan
miyako no yama ni
kakaru tsukikage
Upon the eastern roads
All night I turn my gaze –
Tell him that,
O moonlight, sinking
Toward the mountains round the capital!

Nobusada
900

Both Left and Right say they find no faults.

In judgement: the Left starts with ‘My home I left in floods’ (furusato ni ideshi ni masaru) and concludes with ‘the wild wind round my pillow breaks us apart in dreams’ (arashi no makura yume ni wakarete) – this is a form of words the quality of which I am entirely unable to convey with my own clumsy expressions, but the Right’s ‘O moonlight, sinking toward the mountains round the capital’ (miyako no yama ni kakaru tsukikage) is awash with a sense of tears, so it is most unclear which should win or lose. Both truly seem to reflect the conception of this topic ‘Love and Travel’ well. The poems have been so good every round that my brush is drenched with this old man’s tears, and I can find no other way to express it.

 

Love V: 26

Left (Win).
都にて馴れにし物をひとり寢の片敷く袖は何かさびしき

miyako nite
narenishi mono o
hitori ne no
katashiku sode wa
nani ka sabishiki
In the capital
I grew accustomed to it, but
Sleeping alone
With only a single sleeve spread out
Is somehow sad…

Lord Suetsune
891

Right.
妹だにも待つとし聞かば小余綾のいそぐ舟路も嬉しからまし

imo dani mo
matsu to shi kikaba
koyurugi no
isogu funaji mo
ureshikaramashi
That girl of yours
Awaits you – were I to hear that,
From Koyurugi’s
Rocky shore in haste I’d go, even
The sea-lanes filled with joy!

The Provisional Master of the Empress Household Office.
892

The Right state: the Left’s poem lacks the essence of love on a journey, and even the sense of sorrow seems insufficient. The Left state: the Right’s poem has no particular faults.

In judgement: what do the Right mean by saying the Left ‘lack the essence of love on a journey’? And is it really right that ‘is somehow sad’ (nani ka sabishiki) is insufficient? The poem is composed to give an impression of someone fooling themselves. The Right’s ‘Koyurugi’ is certainly not an expression which I have not come across. However, the Left should win.

GSS XIX: 1313

When a woman who had long been in the same house left, on hearing that her parents in the province of Mino were unwell.

今はとて立帰ゆくふるさとの不破の関路に都忘るな

ima Fa tote
taikaFeriyuku
Furusato no
Fuwa no sekidi ni
miyako wasuruna
“Now is the time,” you say
Getting up to leave for
Your home on
The roads past the barrier of Fuwa,
Don’t forget the capital!

Fujiwara no Kiyotada (? – 958)
藤原清正