Tag Archives: dreams

Love VII: 3

Left (Win).
戀ゆへに憂き世を捨て隱れなば忍ぶの山やすみかなるべき

koi yue ni
ukiyo o sutete
kakurenaba
shinobu no yama ya
sumika narubeki
If for love
I should depart this cruel world
And hide myself away,
Would Mount Shinobu
Then become my dwelling?

Lord Kanemune.
965

Right.
夢にだにまだふみも見ぬ忍山深き戀路をいかで尋ん

yume ni dani
mada fumi mo minu
shinobuyama
fukaki koiji o
ikade tazunen
Even in my dreams
Have I yet to tread – or send a note – so why
Do I to Mount Shinobu’s
Deep paths of love
Pay a visit?

Lord Takanobu.
966

Both Left and Right together state there are no faults to indicate in the opposing poem.

In judgement: I do wonder about the Left’s use of ‘and hide myself away’ (kakurenaba), but in addition to the Right’s ‘Have I yet to tread – or send a note’ (mada minu fumi) certainly evoking ‘the paths of Ikuno lie far away’ (ikuno no michi no tōkereba), ‘why to deep paths of love pay a visit’ (fukaki koiji o ikade tazunen), sounds as if the poet is wondering whether his love is shallow or not. The Left should win.

Rokujō sai’in baishi naishinnō ke uta’awase 9

Left
たれか又暁ごとに夢さめて羽掻く鴫の声を聞くらむ

tareka mata
akatuki goto ni
yume samete
Fane kaku sigi no
kowe wo kikuramu
Who is it that yet
With every single dawn
Awakens from her dreams, and
The wing-beating snipes’
Cries does hear?

Koma
小馬
17

Right
我ならで誰か聞くらむ暁の羽掻く鴫の数を尽くして

ware narade
tare ka kikuramu
akatuki no
Fane kaku sigi no
kazu wo tukusite
If not I, then
Who is it that will hear?
With the dawn
The snipes’ wing-beats
Coming to an end…

Saemon
左衛門
18

Love V: 30

Left (Tie).
故郷を出でしにまさる涙かな嵐の枕夢に別れて

furusato ni
ideshi ni masaru
namida kana
arashi no makura
yume ni wakarete
My home
I left in floods
Of tears;
The wild wind round my pillow
Breaks us apart in dreams…

Lord Sada’ie
899

Right.
東路の夜半の眺めを語らなん都の山にかゝる月影

azumaji no
yowa no nagame o
kataranan
miyako no yama ni
kakaru tsukikage
Upon the eastern roads
All night I turn my gaze –
Tell him that,
O moonlight, sinking
Toward the mountains round the capital!

Nobusada
900

Both Left and Right say they find no faults.

In judgement: the Left starts with ‘My home I left in floods’ (furusato ni ideshi ni masaru) and concludes with ‘the wild wind round my pillow breaks us apart in dreams’ (arashi no makura yume ni wakarete) – this is a form of words the quality of which I am entirely unable to convey with my own clumsy expressions, but the Right’s ‘O moonlight, sinking toward the mountains round the capital’ (miyako no yama ni kakaru tsukikage) is awash with a sense of tears, so it is most unclear which should win or lose. Both truly seem to reflect the conception of this topic ‘Love and Travel’ well. The poems have been so good every round that my brush is drenched with this old man’s tears, and I can find no other way to express it.

 

Love IV: 29

Left.
寢覺まで猶苦しき行歸り足も休めぬ夢の通ひ路

nezame made
nao kurushiki
yukikaeri
ashi mo yasumenu
yume no kayoiji
Until I awaken
It is ever painful
Going back and forth
My feet not resting once
Upon the path of dreams.

Lord Ari’ie.
837

Right.
忘らるゝ身をば思はで龍田山心にかゝる沖つ白波

wasuraruru
mi o ba omowade
tatsuta yama
kokoro ni kakaru
oki tsu shiranami
Forgotten
I think not on myself, but
On Mount Tatsuta
Dwells my heart
Whipped by whitecaps…

Jakuren.
838

The Gentlemen of the Right: no faults to mention. The Gentlemen of the Left state: the Right’s poem does not have anything to say beyond what is contained in its origin poem.

In judgement: the Left’s poem takes the conception of Komachi’s poem ‘my feet don’t rest, constantly trailing to you, yet’ (ashi mo yasumezu kayoedomo) and skilfully adds ‘Until I awaken it is ever painful’ (nezame made nao kurushiki). The Right’s poem is based upon the poem ‘where, through night’s depths, my Lord’ (yowa ni ya kimi ga), but then says ‘Dwells my heart whipped by whitecaps’ (kokoro ni kakaru oki tsu shiranami), which sounds pleasant, too. They are comparable and should tie.

Love IV: 4

Left.
つれなさの類までやはつらからぬ月をも愛でじ在明の空

tsurenasa no
tagui made ya wa
tsurakaranu
tsuki o mo medeji
ariake no sora
Heartless on parting are you,
And just so is the
Indifferent
Moon – no more will I care for it! –
In the sky at dawn.

Lord Ari’ie.
787

Right (Win).
逢ふと見る情もつらし暁の露のみ深き夢の通い路

au to miru
nasake mo tsurashi
akatsuki no
tsuyu nomi fukaki
yume no kayoiji
We met, I saw, and
How fond were you, but how cruel
The dawn, when
I was drenched with dew alone from
The path of dreams…

Lord Takanobu.
788

The Gentlemen of the Right state: if the Left allude to the poem ‘At the dawning / How cruel it seemed / To part’, then this poem refers to the cruelty of a lover, but their poem suggests that the moon is the cruel one. Is this appropriate? In response: ‘At the dawning / How cruel it seemed’ can also be interpreted as referring to the moon. The Gentlemen of the Left state: the Right use the diction ‘fond’ (nasake), but the sense of this does not follow in the poem.

In judgement: the Left builds on the poem which starts ‘At the dawning / How cruel it seemed / To part, but’ and then says more than the lover’s heartlessness, ‘The fading moon / Cared not at all.’ So, given that this is the case, it’s not really saying anything different from ‘No more will I care for the moon!’ As for the Right, it sounds as if the lover’s fondness appears in the ‘dream’ (yume), but the final section seems good. The Right’s poem is somewhat superior.

Love III: 11

Left.

年ぞ經る見る夜な夜なも重ならで我も無き名か夢かとぞ思

toshi zo furu
miru yonayona mo
kasanarade
ware mo nakina ka
yume ka to zo omou
The years go by
And meeting night after night
Is so rare, that
Even for me a baseless rumour, or
A dream, it seems…

Lord Sada’ie.

741

Right (Win).

心ざし有るか無きかの忘れ水いかなる折に思ひ出づらむ

kokorozashi
aru ka naki ka no
wasuremizu
ikanaru ori ni
omoi’izuramu
Your love for me:
Is it real, or is it not,
Like a forgotten stream;
When, for certain,
Do you remember me, I wonder…

Lord Tsune’ie.

742

The Gentlemen of the Right state: we wonder, somewhat, about the link in ‘Even for me a baseless rumour, or a dream, it seems’ (ware mo nakina ka yume ka to zo). The Gentlemen of the Left state: the Right’s poem is old-fashioned.

In judgement: the Left’s poem certainly has the fault of obscuring its subject – there can be no doubt of this. The conception of the Right’s ‘forgotten stream’ (wasuremizu) is not retained in contemporary poetry, I think. And yet, while it is old fashioned, I cannot recall such a usage. In the absence of this, it must seem novel. Thus, in the end, the Right should win.

Love II: 26

Left.

何か我今朝名残を歎かまし帰る程なく暮るる日ならば

nani ka ware
kesa nagori o
nagekamashi
kaenu hodo naku
kururu hi naraba
Why should I
This morning for my keepsake
Have only grief?
If but a while from leaving
The sun sets once again…

Lord Suetsune

711

Right (Win).

しばしなる今朝の別に見つる哉心がはりの行末の夢

shibashinaru
kesa no wakare ni
mitsuru kana
kokoro gawari no
yukusue no yume
For just a while
At this morning’s parting
Did I see it:
Your change of heart
In a prescient dream…

Lord Nobusada

712

The Gentlemen of the Right state: the Left’s poem is entirely in the conception of a morning after poem. This does not match the conception of this topic. The Gentlemen of the Left state: the sense of the Right’s poem is difficult to grasp. The use of ‘dream’ (yume) does not fit with the remainder of the poem’s contents.

Shunzei’s judgement: in terms of the Left’s poem, the morning after is also a parting. What fault can be found in this? However, the Right’s ‘change of heart in a prescient dream’ sounds charming. Thus, the Right wins.

Love I: 12

Left (Win).

忍つゝこの世盡きなば思ふこと苔の下にや共に朽なん

shinobitsutsu
kono yo tsukinaba
omou koto
koke no shita ni ya
tomo ni kuchinan
Continually concealing:
Should this world end, then
My love for you
Beneath the moss,
With me, would rot away…

Lord Ari’ie.

623

Right.

あくがるゝ心の誰が床に行てあやむばかりの夢に見ゆらん

akugaruru
kokoro no tare ga
toko ni yukite
ayamu bakari no
yume ni miyuran
Summoned
My heart to someone’s
Bed does go;
Simply a strange
Dream, would she see?

Lord Takanobu.

624

The Gentlemen of both Left and Right state: the final section of the other team’s poem is not bad.

Shunzei’s judgement: while I feel that the conception and diction of both poems seems fine [sugata kotoba yoroshiku miehaberu], the Right’s heart, flitting off to someone quite plainly, seems rather frivolous. The Left’s ‘beneath the moss’ (koke no shita ni ya) closely resembles the conception of the topic. It should win.