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Saishō chūjō kuninobu no ie no uta’awase 13

Left (Win).
思ひあまりながむる空の掻き曇り月さへ我を厭ひつるかな

omoFi’amari
nagamuru sora no
kakikumori
tuki saFe ware wo
itoFituru kana
Filled full with love
The sky on which I turn my gaze
Is drowned in darkness;
Even the moon from me
Does shy!

The Consultant Middle Captain 宰相中将
[Minamoto no Kuninobu 源国信]
25

Right.
嵐吹く夜寒の里の寝覚めにはいとど人こそ恋ひしかりけれ

arasi Fuku
yo samu no sato no
nezame ni Fa
itodo Fito koso
koFisikarikere
Stom winds rage
Round my night-chilled home;
Starting from sleep
How much more do
I love her now…

The Minister of Justice 刑部卿
[Minamoto no Akinaka 源顕仲]
26

SIS XVII: 1141

During the Tenryaku era, when people had gathered at Ise’s house, to say that she was coming.

時雨つゝふりにし宿の言の葉は掻集むれど止らざりけり

siguretutu
Furinisi yado no
koto no Fa Fa
kakiatumuredo
tomarazarikeri
Ever does the drizzle
Fall at my home –
My leaves of words
I sweep all together, but
Never does it end.

Nakatsukasa (?912-?991)
中務

Love VI: 17

Left.
いつも聞く物とや人の思らむ來ぬ夕暮れの秋風の聲

itsumo kiku
mono to ya hito no
omouramu
konu yūgure no
akikaze no koe
Always do I hear
The same, is that what
He thinks?
This evening, when he has not come
Whispers the autumn wind.

A Servant Girl.
933

Right (Win).
心あらば吹かずもあらなん宵宵に人待つ宿の庭の松風

kokoro araba
fukazu mo aranan
yoiyoi ni
hito matsu yado no
niwa no matsukaze
If you have any pity,
Then I would not have you blow
Night after night
While I wait for him, through my home’s
Garden pines, o, wind!

Nobusada.
934

Both Left and Right state: we can grasp the sense of the opposing poem.

In judgement: I am unable to tell what it is that ‘does not come one evening’ (konu yūgure). ‘Whispers the autumn wind’ (akikaze no koe) is also perhaps rather novel. The Right’s ‘Garden pines, o, wind!’ (niwa no matsukaze) sounds pleasant. It should win.

Love VI: 6

Left (Win).
袖のうへになるるも人の形見かは我と宿せる秋の夜の月

sode no ue ni
naruru mo hito no
katami ka wa
ware to yadoseru
aki no yo no tsuki
Resting atop my sleeves
Of my love so fond
Are these keepsakes?
Remaining with me, alone
Is the moon this autumn night…

A Servant Girl.
911

Right.
ひとり住む宿の気色とあはれとや憂き身とゝもに在明の月

hitori sumu
yado no keshiki to
aware to ya
ukimi to tomo ni
ariake no tsuki
Living alone,
Is the sight of my home
So pitiful?
Alike are we in desolation,
O, dawntime moon!

Lord Tsune’ie.
912

The Right state: the Left’s poem has no faults. The Left state: the Right’s poem lacks a clear conception of love.

In judgement: the Left’s poem, indeed, has no faults. It should win.

Love V: 30

Left (Tie).
故郷を出でしにまさる涙かな嵐の枕夢に別れて

furusato ni
ideshi ni masaru
namida kana
arashi no makura
yume ni wakarete
My home
I left in floods
Of tears;
The wild wind round my pillow
Breaks us apart in dreams…

Lord Sada’ie
899

Right.
東路の夜半の眺めを語らなん都の山にかゝる月影

azumaji no
yowa no nagame o
kataranan
miyako no yama ni
kakaru tsukikage
Upon the eastern roads
All night I turn my gaze –
Tell him that,
O moonlight, sinking
Toward the mountains round the capital!

Nobusada
900

Both Left and Right say they find no faults.

In judgement: the Left starts with ‘My home I left in floods’ (furusato ni ideshi ni masaru) and concludes with ‘the wild wind round my pillow breaks us apart in dreams’ (arashi no makura yume ni wakarete) – this is a form of words the quality of which I am entirely unable to convey with my own clumsy expressions, but the Right’s ‘O moonlight, sinking toward the mountains round the capital’ (miyako no yama ni kakaru tsukikage) is awash with a sense of tears, so it is most unclear which should win or lose. Both truly seem to reflect the conception of this topic ‘Love and Travel’ well. The poems have been so good every round that my brush is drenched with this old man’s tears, and I can find no other way to express it.