Tag Archives: kimi

Love VI: 21

Left (Tie).
かきくらし降りくる雨も君ならば濡るとてさらに厭はざらまし

kakikurashi
furikuru ame mo
kimi naraba
nuru tote sara ni
itowazaramashi
All is darkened by
The falling rain, but
Were that to be you, my love,
I would be drenched, but
It would not be unwelcome!

Lord Kanemune.
941

Right.
ひとり寢の床にしもなど音す覧しづかたにそゝく暁の雨

hitorine no
toko ni shimo nado
otosuran
shizukata ni sosoku
akatsuki no ame
Sleeping solo
In my bed, so why
Is there the sound
Of quiet dripping
Dawntime rain?

Lord Takanobu.
942

The Right state: while the Left’s poem does have a desirable sentiment, its expression is outrageous. The Left state: why, indeed, should there be a sound in the poet’s bed?

In judgement: the Left’s desirable sentiment is perfectly commonplace in poetry. The Right, with ‘dawntime rain’ (akatsuki no ame), is elegant. The poems are comparable and tie.

MYS II: 146

A poem composed on the occasion of the Imperial visit to the province of Ki in the first year of Taihō [701].

後見むと君が結べる磐代の小松がうれをまたも見むかも

noti mimu to
kimi ga musuberu
ipasiro no
komatu ga ure wo
mata mo mimu kamo
Thinking to see it more
The Prince did tie
At Iwashiro
Pine saplings’ tips –
I wonder, will he see them more…

This poem appears in the Kakinonomot no Hitomaro Collection.

MYS XVI: 3835

A poem presented to Imperial Prince Niitabe.

勝間田の池は我れ知る蓮なししか言ふ君が鬚なきごとし

katumata no
ike pa ware siru
patisu nasi
sika ipu kimi ga
pige naki gotosi
Katsumata
Pond, I do know well:
It has no lotus;
And you say so, my Lord,
Have no beard, either!

A certain person has told me they had heard the following about this poem: Prince Niitabe had left the precincts of the capital for a pleasure trip and, on seeing Kasumata Pond, was deeply moved. On his return, his interest in the pond did not abate. Then, he said to a lady, ‘If you saw Katsumata Pond, where I went today, words could not describe the sight of the light reflecting brilliantly from the surface of the waters, and special beauty of the lotus flowers, which were in full bloom.’ Then the lady composed this humourous poem and sang it to him.