Tag Archives: kokoro

Love V: 1

Left.
昔我振分髪を見てしより戀に亂て老いぞしにける

mukashi ware
furiwakegami o
miteshi yori
koi ni midarete
oi zo shinikeru
Long ago, I,
Your hair, bunched on either side,
Did glimpse, and ever since
In a confusion of love
Have I grown old.

Lord Suetsune.
841

Right (Win).
色に染む心は同じ昔にて人のつらきに老を知るかな

iro ni somuru
kokoro wa onaji
mukashi nite
hito no turaki ni
oi o shiru kana
Being charmed by beauty
My heart is just the same
As long ago, but
How cruel for me now,
Feeling my age…

Lord Takanobu.
842

The Right state: ‘Your hair, bunched on either side’ (furiwakegami) appears very abruptly. In addition, we wonder about the appropriateness of evoking youthful love. The Left state: the Right’s poem has no faults to indicate.

In judgement: the confusion evoked by ‘your hair, bunched on either side’ seems to have lasted rather too long. The Right’s poem sounds exactly as it should be. Thus, the Right should win.

GSIS XIII: 751

Composed and sent to the same place.

陸奥の緒絶えの橋やこれならむふみゝふまずみ心まどはす

mitinoku no
wodae no Fasi ya
kore naramu
Fumi mi Fumazu
mikokoro madoFasu
In Michinoku
Is the bridge of Odae
Such as this?
Trodden then untrodden, letters and then non
It does twist my heart.

Master of the Left Capital Office, Michimasa
左京大夫通雅

KYS VII: 379

Sent to a woman who had fled from him.

恋すてふ門司の関守いく度かわれ書きつらむ心づくしに

koFisu teFu
mozi no sekimori
iku tabi ka
ware kakituramu
kokoro dukusi ni
Love – with that
Word I am warden of the barrier at Moji;
How many times have
I written it?
To the utter exhaustion of my heart!

Fujiwara no Akisuke (1090-1155)
藤原顕輔

This poem is also: Akisuke-shū 顕輔集 (1155?) 5.

SZS XVI: 940

Composed as a Love poem, when His Majesty commanded a hundred poem sequence.

いまはただおさふる袖も朽ち果てて心のままにおつる涙か

ima Fa tada
osaFuru sode mo
kutiFatete
kokoro no mama ni
oturu namida ka
Now, simply
Have my wave-dashed sleeves
Rotted all away;
Is there nothing in my heart
But dripping tears?

Fujiwara no Suemichi
藤原季通

Love IV: 29

Left.
寢覺まで猶苦しき行歸り足も休めぬ夢の通ひ路

nezame made
nao kurushiki
yukikaeri
ashi mo yasumenu
yume no kayoiji
Until I awaken
It is ever painful
Going back and forth
My feet not resting once
Upon the path of dreams.

Lord Ari’ie.
837

Right.
忘らるゝ身をば思はで龍田山心にかゝる沖つ白波

wasuraruru
mi o ba omowade
tatsuta yama
kokoro ni kakaru
oki tsu shiranami
Forgotten
I think not on myself, but
On Mount Tatsuta
Dwells my heart
Whipped by whitecaps…

Jakuren.
838

The Gentlemen of the Right: no faults to mention. The Gentlemen of the Left state: the Right’s poem does not have anything to say beyond what is contained in its origin poem.

In judgement: the Left’s poem takes the conception of Komachi’s poem ‘my feet don’t rest, constantly trailing to you, yet’ (ashi mo yasumezu kayoedomo) and skilfully adds ‘Until I awaken it is ever painful’ (nezame made nao kurushiki). The Right’s poem is based upon the poem ‘where, through night’s depths, my Lord’ (yowa ni ya kimi ga), but then says ‘Dwells my heart whipped by whitecaps’ (kokoro ni kakaru oki tsu shiranami), which sounds pleasant, too. They are comparable and should tie.

Love IV: 21

Left (Win).
あらましに心は盡きぬ今夜とて待たばと思ふ夕暮の空

aramashi ni
kokoro wa tsukinu
koyoi tote
mataba to omou
yūgure no sora
Wondering if it will it be
Has been the sole focus of my thoughts;
Tonight, he said –
‘If only you could wait,’ so thinks
The evening sky…

Lord Ari’ie.
821

Right.
心さへかきくらすかなつくづくと思ひ入り日の空を眺めて

kokoro sae
kakikurasu kana
tsukuzuku to
omoi irihi no
sora o nagamete
My very heart
Is sunk in darkness;
On and on,
Go my thoughts with the setting sun,
Gazing at the sky…

Lord Tsune’ie.
822

The Right state: we find no faults. The Left state: saying ‘on and on’ (tsukuzuku) seems somewhat weak.

In judgement: the final line of the Left’s poem sounds elegant. Again, I make the Left the winner.