Tag Archives: kuzu

MYS VIII: 1538

[One of] two poems composed by Yamanoue no Okura listing the flowers of the autumn fields.

萩の花尾花葛花なでしこの花をみなへしまた藤袴朝顔の花

pagi no pana
wobana kudupana
nadesiko no pana
wominapesi
mata pudibakama
asagapo no pana
Bush clover blooms,
Silver grass and kudzu,
Pinks,
Valerian
And fujibakama,
Morning glory blooms.

Yamanoue no Okura
山上憶良

Love III: 19

Left.
引かへて荒き氣色をみだらおのこまごまとこそ恨かけつれ

hikikaete
araki keshiki o
midarao no
komagoma to koso
uramikaketure
You have changed, and
Dishevelled in appearance
As a piebald
Colt, you are not, yet
I hate you still!

Kenshō
757

Right (Win).
露しげき秋の野も狭の眞葛原いつまでよその物と聞きけん

tsuyu shigeki
aki no no mo se no
makuzubara
itsu made yoso no
mono to kikiken
Dew drenched,
The autumn field is all
Covered with kuzu,
For how long will such distant
Whispers reach me?

Lord Takanobu
758

The Right state: the Left’s poem sounds pretentious. We are also unable to accept the use of ‘colt, you are not’ (komagoma). The Left state: the Right’s poem sounds archaic.

In judgement: ‘Dishevelled in appearance as a piebald’ (araki keshiki o midarao) is entirely unacceptable style. As for ‘covered with kuzu’, while ‘field is all’ (no mo se) is also undesirable, the final section is elegant. It should win over ‘piebald’.

Winter I: 17

Left (Win).

夢かさは野邊の千草の面影はほのぼの招く薄ばかりや

yume ka sa wa
nobe no chigusa no
omokage wa
honobono maneku
susuki bakari ya
Was it all a dream?
Across the fields a thousand blooms
Did meet my gaze; now
Dimly beckoning
Are there only fronds of miscanthus grass…

Lord Sada’ie.

513

Right.

むら薄たえだえ野邊に招けども下延ふ葛ぞ恨果てぬる

murasusuki
taedae nobe ni
manekedomo
shita hau kuzu zo
uramihatenuru
The clumps of miscanthus grass
From time to time across the fields
Do wave, yet
The creeping arrowroot beneath
Holds all my regrets…

Jakuren.

514

The Right state that the initial line of the Left’s poem is ‘awkward’ [amari nari], and that they cannot approve of the final use of ya. The Left wonder about the appropriateness of ‘Holds all my regrets’ (uramihatenuru).

Shunzei’s judgement: The Gentlemen of the Right have a number of criticisms of the Left’s poem. However, with careful consideration, while the poem is not tasteful in its entirety [subete yū ni shimo arazaredo], the initial line does not seem that strange, and the final ya is fine, is it not? The Right’s ‘The clumps of miscanthus grass from time to time across the fields do wave’ is tasteful [yū naru], but all that connects with ‘arrowroot’, is the subsequent ‘seeing what lies beneath’. ‘Arrowroot’ is too briefly in the poem for this. The initial and final sections of the Left’s poem have been criticised by the Gentlemen of the Right, but they are not without purpose. Thus, the Left wins.

Autumn 39

Left.

あさなあさなあへず散りしく葛の葉に置そふ霜の秋ぞすくなき

asana asana
aezu chirishiku
kuzu no ha no
okisou shimo no
aki zo sukunaki
Morning after morning
Never ceasing, scatter
Arrowroot leaves,
Burdened by frost:
There’s little left, of Autumn now.

77

Right (Win)

秋はいぬ夕日がくれの峰の松四方の木の葉の後もあひ見ん

aki wa inu
yūhigakure no
mine no matsu
yomo no ko no ha no
nochi mo aimin
Autumn is now gone;
The evening sun concealing
Peaks, topped with pines,
About them, fallen leaves:
An aftermath we’ll watch together.

78