Tag Archives: maidenflowers

SIS III: 161

When he had gone to Saga to dig up plants for his garden.

日暮しに見れ共あかぬ女郎花のべにや今宵旅ねしなまし

higurasi ni
miredomo akanu
wominaFesi
nobe ni ya koyoFi
tabinesinamasi
At the sunset
I see, yet cannot get my fill
Of maidenflowers, so
In the fields tonight
Should I make a traveller’s bed?

Fujiwara no Nagayoshi
藤原長能

Autumn III: 19

Left.

女郎花まだきに霜をいたゞきて盛り過ぬる氣色なる哉

ominaeshi
madaki ni shimo o
itadakite
morisuginuru
keshiki naru kana
Upon the maidenflowers
Already has frost
Fallen, so
Past their prime
They look, indeed!

Lord Suetsune.

457

Right (Win).

もみぢ葉はをのが染たるいろぞかしよそげに置ける今朝の霜かな

momijiba wa
ono ga sometaru
iro zo kashi
yosoge ni okeru
kesa no shimo kana
The autumn leaves –
‘Tis you have stained
Them with your hue!
Indifferently falling
Frost-flakes in the morning…

Nobusada.

458

The Right have no criticisms to make of the Left’s poem this round. The Left wonder about the appropriateness of ‘indifferently falling’ (yosoge ni okeru).

Shunzei’s judgement: The Left saying that on ‘maidenflowers frost falling’ (ominaeshi shimo o itadaki) would put them past their prime seems pointless [sada ni oyobazaru ka]. In addition the final ‘they look, indeed’ (keshiki naru kana) seems feeble [chikara naki]. The Right’s style is intriguing [fūtei kyō arite]. I must make it the winner.

Autumn I: 25

Left (Win).

萩が枝をしがらむ鹿も荒かりし風のねたさに猶しかずけり

hagi ga eda
oshigaramu shika mo
arakarishi
kaze no netasa ni
nao shikazukeri
Bush clover branches
Tangled, are trodden by deer;
The wild
Wind’s spite
O’erthrown.

Kenshō.

349

Right.

女郎花野分の風の荒さには靡きながらも露やこぼるゝ

ominaeshi
nowaki no kaze no
arasa ni wa
nabikinagaramo
tsuyu ya koboruru
Maidenflowers,
In the gusting gales
Rage,
Trembling,
Do they let fall their drops of dew?

Lord Tsune’ie.

350

The Right wonder, ‘Whether the conception of “autumn gales” is adequately expressed by “wild winds”?’ In response, the Left say, ‘Poems on “autumn gales” are not found in previous ages. But is this not what is intended by poems such as “Wild winds have left behind”? Furthermore, on the gentlemen of the Right’s poem, as “gales” (nowaki) contain the sense of “rage” (arasa ni wa), is it not superfluous? Moreover, in the final section, the poem could refer to any blossom – not just maidenflowers.’

Shunzei states: ‘The Left’s “o’erthrown’ (nao shikazukeri) feels old-fashioned, while the prior section’s “wind’s spite” (kaze no netasa) is more modern. This produces a result akin to seeing a peasant wearing smart shoes, I feel. The Right’s “gales” letting dewdrops fall is so obvious a situation as to be pedestrian. Thus, despite the mis-match between sections in the Left’s poem, it must win.’

SKKS XVI: 1567

When the Hoshō-ji Lay Priest and Former Grand Minister [Fujiwara no Michinaga] plucked a maidenflower, and said Murasaki Shikibu must be able to compose an appropriate poem.

をみなへしさかりの色をみるからにつゆのわきける身こそしらるれ

ominaeshi
sakari no iro o
miru kara ni
tsuyu no wakikeru
mi koso shirarure
The maidenflowers’
Hues are at their best,
I see, so
The dewfall must have distinguished
‘Tween them and me–how well I know it!

Murasaki Shikibu
紫式部