Tag Archives: mikasa

SKS IX: 335

When the Go-nijō Regent [Fujiwara no Moromichi] was angry about some problematic circumstances, Nakamasa was at his residence, and did not present this to him directly, but said to the ladies in waiting.

三笠山さすがに蔭に隱ろへてふるかひもなきあめの下哉

mikasayama
sasuga ni kage ni
kakuroFete
Furu kaFi mo naki
ame no sita kana
On Mount Mikasa
Indeed, by the shade
I am concealed, yet
Continuing on seems pointless
Under such a rain.

Minamoto no Nakamasa
源仲正

SKKS XI: 1011

Sent to a woman with whom he had been exchanging letters, when he heard that a superior in the same office had been visiting her.

白雲の峰にしもなどかよふらんおなじ三笠の山のふもとを

shirakumo no
mine nishimo nado
kayouran
onaji mikasa no
yama no fumoto o
These clouds of white,
Why do they cluster ‘round the peak?
Coming and going
From the selfsame Mikasa
Mountain’s foot…

Fujiwara no Yoshitaka (954-974)

Miscellaneous 92

Left (Tie).

和歌の浦やなぎたる朝のみをつくし朽ちねかひなき名だに殘らで

waka no ura
yanagitaru asa no
miotsukushi
kuchine kainaki
na dani nokorade
At Waka Bay
In the calm of morning,
The channel buoys stand: exhausted
I crumble, not even my useless
Name remaining to me.

183

Right (Tie).

思ひかね我夕暮の秋の日に三笠の山はさしはなれにき

omoikane
ware yūgure no
aki no hi ni
mikasa no yama wa
sashihanareniki
I cannot think on it more:
Here, in my evening,
Autumn days,
Mikasa Mountain is
Far away, indeed…

184

GSIS XVI: 927

Composed on hearing that a man had come calling on a night when it was raining heavily on a woman who had told him not to come again.

み笠山さし離れぬときゝしかど雨もよにとは思ひし物を

mikasa yama
sasiFanarenu to
kikisikado
ame mo yo ni to Fa
omoFisi mono wo
The Mount of Mikasa
Is very far from you,
I’d heard;
Surely, not in such rain,
Or so I did think!

Izumi Shikibu
和泉式部

KKS IX: 406

Composed when he was in China, gazing up at the moon.

あまの原ふりさけ見ればかすがなるみかさの山にいでし月かも

ama no Fara
Furisakemireba
kasuga naru
mikasa no yama ni
idesi tuki kamo
To the fields of heaven,
I lift my gaze;
In Kasuga
Above Mount Mikasa
Appeared the selfsame moon.

Abe no Nakamaro (ca 700-770)

It is told that, a long time ago, Nakamaro had been sent to China to study and, after many years without being able to return home, he had the chance to take passage with a Japanese embassy; on saying he was departing , some Chinese gave him a farewell banquet at a place called Meishū (Mingzhou) on the coast. When it grew dark, he saw that a particularly beautiful moon was shining, and composed this poem.