Tag Archives: miscanthus

Love I: 27

Left (Tie).

尋ても逢はずは憂さやまさりなん心づくしに生の松原

tazunete mo
awazu wa usa ya
masarinan
kokoro zukushi ni
iki no matsubara
Paying a visit and
Not meeting: the despair
Reaches new heights,
Exhausting my heart, as a journey to
Iki in Matsubara!

Kenshō.

653

Right.

行逢はん契も知らず花薄ほの見し野邊に迷ひぬる哉

yukiawan
chigiri mo shirazu
hana sususki
hono mishi nobe ni
mayoinuru kana
Go, and I will meet her!
Heedless of if such a bond exists,
The miscanthus fronds
Briefly glimpsed across the fields,
Drive me to confusion!

Ietaka.

654

The Gentlemen of the Left and Right state the opposing team’s poem lacks thought.

Shunzei’s judgement: The Left draws excessively on conceits of Kyushu. In the Right’s poem, ‘confusion in the fields’ (nobe no mayoi) does not seem to lead anywhere. Both of these poems lack any real conception other than their use of conceits. The round ties.

Spring I: 24

eft (Tie).

雪消ゆる枯野の下の淺緑去年の草葉や根にかへるらん

yuki kiyuru
kareno no shita no
asamidori
kozo no kusaba ya
ne ni kaeruran
The snows are gone from off
The sere fields, and beneath,
Pale green:
Last year’s growth seems
To have returned to its roots…

A Servant Girl

47

Right (Tie).

春雨は去年見し野邊のしるべかは緑にかへる荻の燒原

harusame wa
kozo mishi nobe no
shirube ka wa
midori ni kaeru
ogi no yakehara
The gentle rains of spring:
To the fields I gazed upon last year
Do they show the way?
For greeness has returned,
To the burnt miscanthus grass…

Jakuren

48

Both teams state that the other’s poem was ‘in the same vein’.

Shunzei judges that the Left’s ‘Last year’s growth seems/To have returned to its roots’ and the Right’s ‘For greeness has returned,/To the burnt miscanthus grass’ are ‘pleasantly charming’, so neither poem can be adjudged the winner.

Winter 42

Left.

神無月くれやすき日の色なれば霜の下葉に風もたまらず

kaminazuki
kureyasuki hi no
iro nareba
shimo no shitaba ni
kaze mo tamarazu
In the Godless Month
The swiftly setting sun’s
Shade is such
That on the frosted under-leaves
The wind rests not at all.

83

Right (Win)

花すゝき草のたもとも朽はてぬ馴てわかれし秋をこふとて

hana susuki
kusa no tamoto
no
kuchihatenu
narete wakareshi
aki o kou tote
The miscanthus blooms,
Those grassy cuffs,
Have withered all away;
Parted from accustomed
Autumn: that was all their longing…

84

SKKS VIII: 793

When he was passing through the fields, having gone down to Michinoku, he saw an impressive tomb and asked whose it was; he was told it was the tomb of ‘the Captain’. On asking which Captain, he was told they meant Sanekata; it was winter, and he absently noted the miscanthus grass all around was withered by the frost and, feeling that there was nothing [there] that suited the time…

くちもせぬその名ばかりをとゞめをきてかれ野のすゝきかたみとぞみる

kuchi mo senu
sono na bakari o
todomeokite
kareno no sususki
katami to zo miru
Imperishable
His name alone
Remains left here;
The frost-burned field of miscanthus
Will be my keepsake.

The Monk Saigyō
西行