Tag Archives: paths

Teishi-in ominaeshi uta’awase 14

せきやまちふみまがひかぞらにむやそのあきのらぬやまべに

osekiyama
michi fumimagai
nakazora ni
hemu ya sono aki no
shiranu yamabe ni
On Oseki Mountain
I wander lost upon the paths;
All uncertain
Will I pass the days of autumn in
Unknown mountain meadows?

27[1]

りもちてしはなゆゑにごりなくまさへまがひみつきにけり

orimochite
mishi hana yue ni
nagori naku
tema sae magai
shimitsukinikeri
A bunch picked in hand,
I gazed at the flowers, and thus
Utterly
Lost track of time,
Completely captivated.

28


[1] A variant of this poem occurs in Uda-in ominaeshi uta’awase (9).

Love VI: 12

Left (Tie).
君がりと浮きぬる心まよふらん雲はいくへぞ空の通ひ路

kimigari to
ukinuru kokoro
mayouran
kumo wa iku e zo
sora no kayoiji
To your home
Drifts my heart
In seeming confusion;
How may layers must the clouds
Pass though on the heavenly paths?

A Servant Girl.
923

Right.
思やるながめも今は絶えぬとや心をうづむ夕暮の雲

omoiyaru
nagame mo ima wa
taenu to ya
kokoro o uzumu
yūgure no sora
Lost in thought
I gazed at you, but now
Is it that it’s done that
Buries my heart beneath
The evening skies?

Ietaka.
924

The Right state: we would have preferred it to have been ‘is it that my heart drifts?’ (ukinuru kokoro ya). The Left state: the Right’s poem lacks faults.

In judgement: the final sections of both poems seem fine. For strict correctness, the Left should have had ‘my drifting heart does seem confused’ (ukinuru kokoro wa mayourashi), but because this would not fit with the poem, he has left it as ‘in seeming confusion’ (mayouran). The poem is fine as it is, without introducing ‘is it that my heart’ (kokoro ya). I don’t know what to make of the expression ‘to your home’ (kimigari), but ‘how may layers must the clouds pass though on the heavenly paths?’ (kumo wa iku e zo sora no kayoiji) is charming. Then again, the Right’s ‘buries my heart beneath the evening skies?’ (kokoro o uzumu yūgure no sora) has a gentle beauty about it. Thus, the round should tie.