Tag Archives: ta

Gon dainagon morofusa no uta’awase 7

Left (Tie).
早苗より穂にいづるまで守る田をかりにのみこそ人は見えけれ

sanaFe yori
Fo ni iduru made
mamoru ta wo
kari ni nomi koso
Fito Fa miekere
From seedlings
Until ripened ears appear,
Warding the paddies,
Only briefly, then,
Can folk be seen!

Anonymous
13

Right.
秋の田に並みよる稲は山川に水ひきうゑし早苗なりけり

aki no ta ni
nami yoru ine Fa
yamagaFa ni
midu Fiki’uwesi
sanaFe narikeri
In the autumn fields
Waves run through the ripening rice;
From a mountain stream
Drawn up, the waters
Seedlings have become…

Yori’ie
頼家
14

Autumn I: 14

Left (Tie).

稲妻の光にのみやなぐさめむ田中の里の夕闇の空

inazuma no
hikari ni nomi ya
nagusamemu
tanaka no sato no
yūyami no sora
Is it lightning’s
Light alone, that
Can console?
Dwelling among the rice-fields
Beneath the blackened evening sky.

Kenshō.

327

Right (Tie).

賤の男が山田の庵の苫を粗み漏る稲妻を友とこそ見れ

shitsu no o ga
yamada no io no
toma o arami
moru inazuma o
tomo to koso mire
A peasant in
The mountain fields, whose hut has
A rough roof of straw:
The lightning dripping in
Seems his single friend.

Lord Tsune’ie.

328

As with the previous round, neither team can find fault with the other’s poem.

Shunzei, however, says, ‘The initial part of the Left’s poem is fine, indeed, but one wonders where the “dwelling among the rice fields” (tanaka no sato) is. I wonder whether nowadays poets can simply refer to a house among the rice fields. I do seem to have heard it before, but for the life of me I cannot remember where. As for the Right’s poem, this, too, has a perfectly standard beginning, but then has the expression “lightning dripping” (moru inazuma) – this seems rather new-fangled to me! Both poems are about the same.’