Tag Archives: toshi

Miwako naishin’ō no ie no uta’awase 10

Left.
年のうちにつもれる罪を残さじと三世の仏の名をぞ唱ふる

toshi no uchi ni
tsumoreru tsumi o
nokosaji to
miyo no hotoke no
na o zo tonauru
Within this year
I have accumulated sins, that
I would not have linger at
The three worlds’ Buddhas’
Names recitation!

Seji 宣旨
19

Right.
君が代を三世の仏に年を経て返す返すも祈るべき哉

kimi ga yo o
miyo no hotoke ni
toshi o hete
kaesugaesu mo
inorubeki kana
That Your Highness reign
The three worlds’ Buddhas’
Years shall pass through
Again and yet again
Shall be my only prayer!

Hyōe 兵衛
20

Love VII: 1

Left (Tie).
年を經て茂るなげきをこりもせでなど深からん物思ひの山

toshi o hete
shigeru nageki o
kori mo sede
nado fukakaran
mono’omoi no yama
The years go by and
My ever verdant grief
Is never felled;
Why am I so deep
In mountains of gloomy thought?

Kenshō.
961

Right.
君にわれ深く心を筑波山しげきなげきにこりはてぬ哉

kimi ni ware
fukaku kokoro o
tsukubayama
shigeki nageki ni
korihatenu kana
You for me
Had deep thoughts once –
All gone now, yet on Tsukuba Mountain
My ever verdant grief
Remains unfelled…

The Supernumerary Master of the Empress’ Household Office.
962

The Right state: we are not familiar with the expression ‘mountains of gloomy thought’ (mono’omoi no yama) used in the Left’s poem. The Left state: the Right’s poem has nothing significant to say.

In judgement: both poems use the wordplay of ‘ever verdant grief’ (shigeki nageki) and a ‘heart unfelled’ (korinu kokoro); they have no particular merits or faults. The round ties.

GSIS VI: 424

Sent around the end of the Twelfth Month from the province of Bizen to the residence of the Controller of Dewa.

都へは年と共にぞ歸るべきやがて春をもむかへがてらに

miyako Fe Fa
tosi to tomo ni zo
kaFerubeki
yagate Faru wo mo
mukaFe gatera ni
To the capital
Along with the year
I must return;
At last, with the spring
Shall I proceed together!

Minamoto no Tameyoshi
源為善 

Love VI: 19

Left.
下とをる涙に袖も朽ちはてゝ着るかひもなき雨衣かな

shita tōru
namida ni sode mo
kuchihatete
kiru kai mo naki
amagoromo kana
Right through to below
With tears are even my sleeves
Quite rotted;
Putting it on would be pointless
This raincoat of mine!

Kenshō.
937

Right (Win).
戀ゆへに身を知る雨の年を經て心のうちにかき曇るらむ

koi yue ni
mi o shiru ame no
toshi o hete
kokoro no uchi ni
kakikumoruramu
For love
The rain knows how I feel full well
Down through the years
Within my heart
The clouds grow ever thicker…

The Supernumerary Master of the Empress Household Office.
938

The Right state: the Left’s ‘right through to below’ (shita tōruʼ) sounds as if the poet is passing below the palace! The Left state: in this poem it is not at all clear why it is that ‘the rain knows how I feel full well’ (mi o shiru ame).

In judgement: the Left, by using ‘right through to below’, has forgotten that ‘raincoat’ (amagoromo) evokes the sense of a salt-hut and, because there is nothing in the poem to suggest a location by the sea, amagoromo appears to be the clothing of a nun, or something similar. As for the Right’s ‘the rain knows how I feel full well’, it is simply ‘for love’. This seems plain to me. The Right wins.