Tag Archives: crickets

GSS V: 257

Topic unknown.

あき風のふきくるよひはきりぎりす草のねごとにこゑみだれけり[1]

akikaze no
fukikuru yoi wa
kirigirisu
kusa no ne goto ni
koe midarekeri
The autumn wind
Comes gusting late at night, when
The crickets
From every single blade of grass
Let out confused cries.

Anonymous


[1] This poem appears in the ‘Poetry Contest held at Prince Koresada’s House’ (Koresada shinnō-ke uta’awase (42).

Koresada shinnō-ke uta’awase 21

あきのよにたれをまつとかひぐらしのゆふぐれごとになきまさるらん

aki no yo ni
tare o matsu to ka
higurashi no
yūgure goto ni
nakimasaruran
On an autumn night
Who is it that you await, I wonder?
The sundown cicadas
With each evening
Cry ever louder…

41

あき風のふきくるよひはきりぎりす草のねごとにこゑみだれけり[1]

akikaze no
fukikuru yoi wa
kirigirisu
kusa no ne goto ni
koe midarekeri
The autumn wind
Comes gusting late at night, when
The crickets
From every single blade of grass
Let out confused cries.

42


[1] This poem was included in Gosenshū (V: 257).

KKS XIX: 1020

A poem from the Poetry Contest held by the Empress Dowager during the reign of the Kanpyō emperor.

秋風にほころびぬらし藤袴つづりさせてふきりぎりすなく

akikaze ni
Fokorobinurasi
Fudibakama
tudurisasete teFu
kirigirisu naku
With the autumn breeze
Seem to have bloomed and twined
The asters
Bound together by the rasping
Crickets’ cries.[1]

Ariwara no Muneyana


[1] This poem is composed around a dual wordplay, which I have not been able to closely replicate in the translation. Hokorobu is simultaneously both ‘bloom fully’ and ‘thread (a needle)’ while tsuzuru is both ‘sew together’ and an onomatopoeic representation of the sound that a cricket makes.