Tag Archives: hollyhocks

Summer I: 16

Left (Tie).

あふひ草かざすけふとぞ思しに花を折りても見えわたるかな

aoigusa
kazasu kyō to zo
omoishi ni
hana o oritemo
miewataru kana
With hollyhock I’d
Deck myself today
I thought,
And found all blessed with blooms
Within my sight!

Lord Kanemune.

211

Right (Tie).

ちはやぶる賀茂のみあれのあふひ草ひきつゞきても渡るけふ哉

chihayaburu
kamo no miare no
aoigusa
hikitsuzukitemo
wataru kyō kana
To mighty
Kamo for these three days have
The hollyhocks
In ever longer lines
Processed toward this day.

Jakuren.

212

The Right, ‘wonder if the Left’s poem doesn’t make the hollyhock seem like an afterthought?’, while the Left content themselves with saying, ‘the initial section of the Right’s poems seems rather dated.’

Shunzei disagrees: ‘The Left’s poem does not make the hollyhocks secondary – rather than implying they are mere decorations, it suggests the beauty of everyone beautifully adorned proceeding toward the shrine. As for the Right’s poem, the use of old-fashioned terms is normal in the context. This makes both poems are equal, and the round should tie.’

Summer I: 15

Left.

流れての世のためしとてかたがたの使立ち來賀茂の川波

nagarete no
yo no tameshi tote
katagata no
tsukai tachikuru
kamo no kawa nami
From times of old
Has it been the custom in this world
For every
Messenger to come flowing in
Ripples on Kamo River.

Lord Ari’ie.

209

Right (Win).

あふひ草秋の宮人かけそへてのどかに渡る賀茂の河水

aoigusa
aki no miyabito
kakesoete
nodoka ni wataru
kamo no kawamizu
With hollyhocks have
Her Majesty’s men
Garlanded the carriage;
Calmly crossing
The waters of Kamo River.

Ietaka.

210

Neither team has any criticisms to make.

Shunzei states that, ‘Both poems are certainly effortlessly worthy of victory, but “calmly crossing the waters of Kamo River” (nodoka ni wataru kamo no kawamizu) sounds slightly more peaceful than “messenger to come flowing in ripples on Kamo River” (tsukai tachikuru kamo no kawa nami), so it should win.’

Summer I: 14

Left (Tie).

むかしより君と神とに引分けてけふのあふひは二葉なりけり

mukashi yori
kimi to kami to ni
hikiwakete
kyō no aoi wa
futaba narikeri
Ever between
My Lord and the God
Has my loyalty been split;
Thus the hollyhocks, today,
Have leaves in pairs…

Kenshō.

207

Right (Tie).

昔よりいつきの宮に吹そめてけふは涼しき賀茂の河風

mukashi yori
itsuki no miya ni
fukisomete
kyō wa suzushiki
kamo no kawakaze
Long since upon
The princess of purity
Has it begun to blow;
Today, so cool is
The breeze from Kamo River…

Nobusada.

208

The Right have no particular comments to make about the Left’s poem, but the Left complain that the Right’s, ‘does not seem that clearly connected with the Kamo Festival. Moreover, “princess of purity” (itsuki no miya) properly refers to the Princess at Ise; the Kamo Princess should be “lady of purity” (itsuki no in), should it not?’

Shunzei states, ‘Both Left and Right this round begin with a reference to the past (mukashi yori) and then continue with “my Lord and the God” (kimi to kami ni) and “the priestess of purity has it begun to blow” (itsuki no miya ni fukisomete) respectively; both are charming in form and spirit, but the gentlemen of the Left have criticised the failure to use “lady” (in). In poetry, though, how could we to use this word? Both the priestess at Ise and the priestess at Kamo are Imperial Princesses. Why, therefore, is it problematic to use the expression? Furthermore, Lord Sanekata composed a poem with the line, “Sleeping on my way to the princess of purity” (itsuki no miya no tabine ni wa), and at the Unrin Temple, in the Tale by the old man, Yotsugi, in praise of Princess Senshi it says, “although there were many princesses of purity in the world…”. This round must tie.’

SKKS III: 182

Composed when she was Kamo High Priestess, at the shrine buildings.

わすれめやあふひをくさにひきむすびかりねのゝべのつゆのあけぼの

wasureme ya
aoi o kusa ni
hikimusubi
karine no nobe no
tsuyu no akebono
Will I forget, I wonder,
Hollyhocks for my pillow
Plucked and twined,
Sleeping briefly in the fields
On this dew-drenched dawning.

Princess Shokushi
式子内親王