Tag Archives: kane

Love V: 4

Left (Win).
君ゆへにいとふも悲し鐘の聲やがて我世もふけにし物を

kimi yue ni
itou mo kanashi
kane no koe
yagate wa ga yo mo
fukenishi mono o
For lack of you, I am
In sorrow and despite;
The tolling of the bell reveals
That so swiftly has my life
Reached its eventide…

A Servant Girl.
847

Right.
玉箒手にとる程も思きやかりにも戀を滋賀の山人

tamahōki
te ni toru hodo mo
omoiki ya
kari ni mo koi o
shiga no yamabito
A jewelled broom
I’ll take in hand now,
Could that have been my thought?
Briefly in love now as
The old man of Shiga Mountain!

Ietaka.
848

The Right state: we wonder about the appropriateness of ‘swiftly’ (yagate). The Left state: should one mention a monk in a poem about Love?

In judgement: the configuration of the Left’s ‘In sorrow and despite; the tolling of the bell’ (itou mo kanashi kane no koe) sounds pleasant, so ‘swiftly’ does not seem unsuited. The Left wins.

 

Love IV: 20

Left (Win).
玉ほこの道行き人も心ありて來んと頼めよこの夕卜には

tamahoko no
michi yukibito mo
kokoro arite
kon to tanomeyo
kono yūke ni wa
Jewelled spear straight
The road for this traveller:
If he longs for me,
Let it say, ‘Come with me!’,
This evening’s fortune!

Lord Kanemune.
819

Right.
逢ことを頼むる暮と思せば入相の鐘も嬉しからまし

au koto o
tanomuru kure to
omoiseba
iriai no kane mo
ureshikaramashi
‘We will meet,
On that you can rely, at dusk,’
He made me think, so
The sunset bell, too,
Does seem full of joy!

The Provisional Master of the Empress’ Household Office.
820

The Right state: evening fortune-telling and crossroad divination are different things. The Left state: the Right’s poem has no faults.

In judgement: both evening fortune-telling and crossroad divination are conducted in the evening, and with either one could wish ‘Let it say, “Come with me!”’ (kon to tanomeyo), so this does not seem to be a mistake does it? The Right has the fault of having both ‘We will meet’ (au koto o) and ‘sunset bell, too’ (iriai no kane mo). The Left should win.

Love IV: 5

Left.
面影も別れに變る鐘の音にならひ悲しき東雲の空

omokage mo
wakare ni kawaru
kane no oto ni
narai kanashiki
shinonome no sora
That your face
Is transformed to parting
By the bell’s toll:
How sad this custom
From the eastern skies!

Lord Sada’ie.
789

Right (Win).
暁の涙やせめてたぐふらん袖に落ち來る鐘の音かな

akatsuki no
namida ya semete
tagūran
sode ni ochikuru
kane no oto kana
At dawn, are
My tears, forced to be
Like them?
Falling on my sleeves:
The tolls of the bell!

Nobusada.
790

The Right state: the sense of the Left’s poem is difficult to grasp on hearing. The Left state: the expression ‘forced to be’ (semete) seems out of place in the context of the Right’s poem.

In judgement: The Left’s poem, just as was said of Kisen’s poetry – that it was ‘obscure of diction and indefinite from beginning to end’  – seems to be in just such a style. The Right’s poem, while it does not, in fact, sound like a suitable context for ‘forced to be’ (semete), provides a profound conception in ‘falling on my sleeves’ (sode ni ochikuru). The Right should win.

Love IV: 3

Left.
きぬぎぬにいまやならんのあらましに逢はぬ床さへ起きぞやられぬ

kinuginu ni
ima ya naran mo
aramashi ni
awanu toko sae
oki zo yararenu
The time to dress, and part
Is now and
So it must be,
Even from my lonely bed
I find I cannot rise…

Lord Suetsune.
785

Right.
明けぬとて別れし空の鐘の音は訪るゝさへ恨めしき哉

akenu tote
wakareshi sora no
kane no oto wa
otozururu sae
urameshiki kana
Dawn has come and
Our parting to the skies
The bells do sound;
That they have rung –
I hate it!

Ietaka.
786

Left and Right both have nothing particular to say.

In judgement: One would have no reason to force oneself from a ‘lonely bed’ (awanu toko) would one [shiite okubekarazu ya]? The Right’s ‘that they have rung’ (otozururu sae) sounds insufficient
[orokani kikoyu]. So, the round should tie.

Love II: 16

Left (Win).

更けにけり頼めぬ鐘は音信て七編さびしき十編の菅薦

fukenikeri
tanomenu kane wa
otozurete
nanafu sabishiki
tofu no sugagomo
Night has fallen,
Untrustworthy, the bell
Tolls – an absent vistor’s
Seven layers lie empty
Of ten layers of woven sedge blanket.

Lord Ari’ie.

691

Right.

今日とても憂きに頼みは變れども待とて安き物思ひかは

kyō tote mo
uki ni tanomi wa
kawaredomo
matsu tote yasuki
mono’omoi ka wa
I thought that today
My despair
To trust would change, yet
While waiting, calmness
Is farthest from my thoughts…

Jakuren.

692

Left and Right both state: we find no faults.

Shunzei’s judgement: the Left, commencing with ‘night has fallen’ (fukenikeri) and continuing with ‘seven layers lie empty’ (nanafu sabishiki) is elegant [yū]. It should win.