Tag Archives: karikoromo

GSS X: 679

When he was sent a set of hunting robes from the residence of a woman he had been visiting secretly, he wrote this on the pattern of the hunting garb.

あふことはとほ山ずりのかりころもきてはかひなきねをのみぞなく

aFu koto Fa
toFoyamazuri no
karikoromo
kite Fa kaFinaki
ne o nomi zo naku
Meeting her:
Distant mountains pattern
My hunting garb:
Donning it is pointless, so
My sobs do simply fall.

Prince Motoyoshi

A kuzushiji version of the poem's text.
Created with Soan.

Winter I: 28

Left.

狩衣をどろの道も立歸り打散る雪の野風寒けし

karigoromo
odoro no michi mo
tachikaeri
uchichiru yuki no
nokaze samukeshi
Clad in hunting garb, and
Down a path of thorns
Returning,
The scattered snowflakes make
The wind off the plain feel all the more chill…

Lord Sada’ie.

535

Right.

諸人の狩場の小野に降る霰今日の御幸に玉ぞ散ける

morobito no
kariba no ono ni
furu arare
kyō no miyuki ni
tama zo chirikeru
Many folk
Have Ono as their hunting ground, but
The hail falling
Today, upon this Imperial Progress
Has scattered jewels.

Ietaka.

536

Neither Left nor Right have any criticisms.

Shunzei’s judgement: ‘A path of thorns’ (odoro no michi mo) recollects the gentlemen of the court when garbed for hawking, and certainly sounds accurate, but the final line does not say anything out of the ordinary. On scattered jewels of ‘hail falling on the hunting ground of Ono’ (kariba no ono ni furu arare), you have ‘many folk’ (morobito no) and then ‘today’s Imperial Progress’ (kyō no miyuki ni) which sounds as if both are indistinguishable. It is impossible to assign a winner or loser this round.

Winter I: 24

Left.

宇津の山夕越え來れば霙降り袖ほしかねつ哀この旅

utsu no yama
yū koekureba
mizore furi
sode hoshikanetsu
aware kono tabi
Gloomy in the Utsu Mountains,
Crossing them at dusk
In a fall of sleet;
I cannot dry my sleeves,
On this lonely journey.

Kenshō.

527

Right.

今日も又交野の御野に霙してかはく間もなき狩衣かな

kyō mo mata
katano no mino ni
mizore shite
kawaku ma mo naki
karigoromo kana
Today once more
On the royal hunting grounds at Katano
Sleet falls;
No time at all to dry
My hunter’s garb…

Lord Tsune’ie.

528

The Right find no faults with the Left’s poem. The Left merely say that the Right’s poem sounds old-fashioned [furumekashi].

Shunzei’s judgement: ‘The Left’s ‘I cannot dry my sleeves, on this lonely journey’ (sode hoshikanetsu aware kono tabi) has a strong sound of loneliness about it [sabite wa kikoehaberu], but there is a lack of anything connected to utsu no yama in this poem. In The Tales of Ise where it says ‘By Utsu Mount in reality‘ (utsu no yamabe no utsutsu ni mo), it does not seem that sleet was falling. If there is no reason for including utsu no yama to express the sense of sleet falling, there are many other places which could have been used to express a lonely journey. As there is no reason for including it, formally [sama de] there is a lack of connection to it. The Right’s katano no mino, too, as in the poem ‘To lend lodging to keep me dry, is there no one‘ is about hail, though hawking does take place there, so the poem does sounds slightly charming [sukoshi okashiku kikoyu]. Both Left and Right use utsu no yama and katano no mino, respectively, unnecessarily – anywhere would have done as well. Both poems are equal for this reason.’

Miscellaneous 86

Left (Tie).

忘れなむ松となつげそなかなかに因幡の山の峰の秋風

wasurenamu
matsu to na tsuge so
nakanaka ni
inaba no yama no
mine no akikaze
I would forget!
And of my pining, tell no-one –
That would be preferable, by far!
Around Inaba Mountain’s
Peak, gusting autumn wind.

171

Right (Tie).

いづくにかこよひは宿をかり衣日もゆふぐれの峰の嵐に

izuku ni ka
koyoi wa yado o
karikoromo
hi mo yūgure no
mine no arashi ni
O, where
This night shelter might I
Find, my hunting-garb’s
Belt tied day and night,
Against the stormwind from the peaks…

172