Tag Archives: ominaeshi

Koresada Shinnō-ke uta’awase 3

音羽山秋としなれば唐錦かけたることも見ゆる紅葉か

otowayama
aki to shi nareba
karanishiki
kaketaru koto mo
miyuru momiji ka
On Otowa Mountain
When autumn comes
Cathay brocade
Is hung about –
Seem so the scarlet leaves?

5

女郎花何の心になけれども秋はさくべきこともゆゆしく

ominaeshi
nani no kokoro ni
nakeredomo
aki wa sakubeki
koto mo yuyushiku
O, maidenflowers,
Something within my heart
Is lacking, yet
That you must bloom in autumn
Is a fine thing, indeed!

6

Fubokushō XI: 4232

A poem from the Poetry Contest held in the first year of Shōtai by former emperor Uda.[1]

wominaFesi
woritoru goto ni
matumusi no
yado Fa karenu to
naku ga kanashiki
O, maidenflowers,
Each and every time I pick you,
The pine crickets, that
Their lodging should not fade away
Do cry, and that is sad, indeed.

Anonymous


[1]The headnote is mistaken, as this poem actually comes from another maidenflower contest held by Uda, the year of which is unknown.

Love IX: 15

Left (Win)
思あまり絵にかきとめてなぐさむる妹が上にも涙落ちけり

omoi amari
e ni kakitomete
nagusamuru
imo ta ue ni mo
namida ochikeri
Too much in love
I paint a picture for
Consolation, but
Upon my darling
Tears fall…

Lord Kanemune
1109

Right
かきとめて変らぬ色もをみなへしあはれと見れば露ぞこぼるる

kakitomete
kawaranu iro mo
ominaeshi
aware to mireba
tsuyu zo koboruru
Painted in
Changeless hues is my love –
A maidenflower
I glimpse in sorrow,
Drenched with dew…

Ietaka
1110

The Right state: the Left’s poem certainly has no faults. The Left state: the Right’s poem has no conception of Love.

In judgement: both Gentlemen’s pictures are ‘painted’ (kakitomete), with the Left then using ‘upon my darling’ (imo ga ue ni mo), which certainly has a conception of love. The Right simply draws a picture of a maidenflower and drenches it with dew, so it does not seem as if he is being moved by the sight of a person. Thus, again, the Left seems the superior poem.

SIS III: 161

When he had gone to Saga to dig up plants for his garden.

日暮しに見れ共あかぬ女郎花のべにや今宵旅ねしなまし

higurasi ni
miredomo akanu
wominaFesi
nobe ni ya koyoFi
tabinesinamasi
At the sunset
I see, yet cannot get my fill
Of maidenflowers, so
In the fields tonight
Should I make a traveller’s bed?

Fujiwara no Nagayoshi
藤原長能

MYS IV: 675

[One of] five poems sent by the Elder Maiden of Nakatomi to Yakamochi, Lord Ōtomo.

をみなへし佐紀沢に生ふる花かつみかつても知らぬ恋もするかも

wominapesi
sakisapa ni opuru
panakatumi
katute mo siranu
kopi mo suru kamo
A maidenflower as,
At Saki Marsh grows
The crested iris
Still unknown is
The love I feel.

Elder Maiden of Nakatomi
中臣郎女

MYS VIII: 1538

[One of] two poems composed by Yamanoue no Okura listing the flowers of the autumn fields.

萩の花尾花葛花なでしこの花をみなへしまた藤袴朝顔の花

pagi no pana
wobana kudupana
nadesiko no pana
wominapesi
mata pudibakama
asagapo no pana
Bush clover blooms,
Silver grass and kudzu,
Pinks,
Valerian
And fujibakama,
Morning glory blooms.

Yamanoue no Okura
山上憶良

Autumn III: 19

Left.

女郎花まだきに霜をいたゞきて盛り過ぬる氣色なる哉

ominaeshi
madaki ni shimo o
itadakite
morisuginuru
keshiki naru kana
Upon the maidenflowers
Already has frost
Fallen, so
Past their prime
They look, indeed!

Lord Suetsune.

457

Right (Win).

もみぢ葉はをのが染たるいろぞかしよそげに置ける今朝の霜かな

momijiba wa
ono ga sometaru
iro zo kashi
yosoge ni okeru
kesa no shimo kana
The autumn leaves –
‘Tis you have stained
Them with your hue!
Indifferently falling
Frost-flakes in the morning…

Nobusada.

458

The Right have no criticisms to make of the Left’s poem this round. The Left wonder about the appropriateness of ‘indifferently falling’ (yosoge ni okeru).

Shunzei’s judgement: The Left saying that on ‘maidenflowers frost falling’ (ominaeshi shimo o itadaki) would put them past their prime seems pointless [sada ni oyobazaru ka]. In addition the final ‘they look, indeed’ (keshiki naru kana) seems feeble [chikara naki]. The Right’s style is intriguing [fūtei kyō arite]. I must make it the winner.