Tag Archives: tears

Koresada shinnō-ke uta’awase 10

あめふればかさとり山のもみぢばはゆきかふ人のそでさへぞてる[1]

ame fureba
kasatoriyama no
momijiba wa
yuki kau hito no
sode sae zo teru
When rain falls on
Kasatori Mountain, take your umbrella,
For the scarlet leaves set
Passing folks’
Sleeves alight!

19

くりかへし我がみをわけてなみだこそ秋のしぐれにおとらざりけれ

kurikaeshi
wa ga mi o wakete
namida koso
aki no shigure ni
otorazarikere
Time and again
Am I broken
By tears;
The autumn drizzle
Cannot outdo them…

20


[1] This poem was included in Kokinshū (V: 263), attributed to Mibu no Tadamine.

Koresada shinnō-ke uta’awase 1

Round One

Left

山だもるあきのかりほにおく露はいなおほせどりのなみだなりけり

yamada moru
aki no kariho ni
oku tsuyu wa
inaosedori no
namida narikeri
Warding mountain fields, in
Autumn upon a hasty hut
The dripping dewdrops are
Migrating birds’
Tears.

Tadamine
1

Right

たつたひめいかなるかみにあればかは山をちくさにあきはそむらん

tatsutahime
ika naru kami ni
areba ka wa
yama o chikusa ni
aki wa somuran
Princess Tatsuta:
What manner of deity
Might she be, that
All the mountain’s thousand grasses
She dyes with autumn hues?

2

Love X: 26

Left (Win)
恋しさに逢ことかへむ市もがなつれなき人の心をも見ん

koishisa ni
au koto kaemu
ichi mo gana
tsurenaki hito no
kokoro o mo min
With love to
Meet and trade –
If only there were such a market!
Then that cruel one’s
Heart I might find there!

Lord Kanemune
1191

Right
商人の舟の昔を思ふにも恨みは深き涙なりけり

akibito no
fune no mukashi o
omou ni mo
urami wa fukaki
namida narikeri
On a merchant’s
Boat, in thoughts
Of long ago,
My despair is deep
As my tears.

Nobusada
1192

The Right state: while the Left’s poem refers to a market, it has no merchant. The Left state: ‘a merchant’s boat’ (akibito no fune) is punted, and the lute is plucked.

In judgement: in regard to the Left’s poem, the Gentlemen of the Right’s criticism is that ‘it refers to a market but has no merchant’. ‘With love to meet and trade’ (koishisa ni au koto kaemu) – that suggests a merchant. There is no cause to look elsewhere for an entirely different one! With regard to the Right’s poem, the Left have their own criticism that ‘a merchant’s boat is punted, and a lute is plucked.’ This is, indeed, a most amusing form of words, but I wonder if such levity is appropriate. This poem sounds as if a merchant’s customer is on board his boat, thinking of the past, and listening to the merchant’s wife play the lute. However, while the playing of the lute long ago is evoked, the conception of today’s love lacks clarity. The Left’s poem should win.

Love IX: 29

Left (Tie)
人待つと荒れ行く閨のさむしろに払はぬ塵を払ふ秋風

hito matsu to
areyuku neya no
samushiro ni
harawanu chiri o
harau akikaze
Awaiting him in
A dilapidated room’s
Chill blankets,
The dust I’ve left untouched is
Brushed by the cloying wind of autumn.

A Servant Girl
1137

Right
夜もすがら泪ながるる狭筵は払はぬ塵も積もらざりけり

yomosugara
namida nagaruru
samushiro wa
harawanu chiri mo
tsumorazarikeri
All night long
My tears flow upon
My blanket, so
Even the dust I’ve left untouched
Does not pile up…

Jakuren
1138

The Right state: we wonder about the appropriateness of the autumn wind blowing into a bedroom. The Left state: the Right’s poem has no faults to mention.

In judgment: while it does not sound as if there is a clear winner or loser between the ‘dust I’ve left untouched’ (harawanu chiri) used by both parties, why on earth should the autumn wind not blow into the Left’s bedroom? Really, there is no fault at all in saying that the wind will blow into a dilapidated bedroom! The Right has ‘dust I’ve left untouched’ flowing away with the speaker’s tears, and lacks any faults from beginning to end, but the configuration of the Left’s concluding ‘dust I’ve left untouched is brushed by the cloying wind of autumn’ is superior. The initial section of this poem is a little lacking, however, so both poems are equivalent and should tie.