Winter I: 13

Left (Win).

見し秋を何に殘さん草の原ひとつに變る野邊のけしきに

mishi aki o
nani ni nokosan
kusa no hara
hitotsu ni kawaru
nobe no keshiki ni
Of the sights of autumn
What should I recall?
The fields of grasses
Have become but one
Single plain within my view…

A Servant Girl.

505

Right.

霜枯の野邊のあはれを見ぬ人や秋の色には心とめけむ

shimogare no
nobe no aware o
minu hito ya
aki no iro ni wa
kokoro tomekemu
A frost-burned
Plain – so sad:
Can one who’s viewed it not
Hold the hues of autumn
Within his heart?

Lord Takanobu.

506

The Right state that the phrase ‘fields of grasses’ (kusa no hara) ‘sounds poor’ [kikiyokarazu]. The Left state that the Right’s poem is ‘antiquated’ [furumekashi].

Shunzei’s judgement: The Left’s ‘What should I recall? The fields of grasses’ (nani ni nokosan kusa no hara) is charming [en ni koso haberumere]. The gentlemen of the Right’s reasoning for finding fault with ‘fields of grasses’ is highly flawed [mottomo utata aru ni ya]. Murasaki Shikibu was better at writing prose than composing poems. Thus, The Festival of the Cherry Blossoms is particularly charming [koto ni en’naru mono nari]. It is highly regrettable for one to compose poetry without having read The Tale of Genji. The Right’s poem does not appear poor in diction and conception [kokoro kotoba ashiku wa miezaru]. However, it is extremely mundane in style [tsune no tei narubeshi]. The Left’s poem is better, and I make it the winner.

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