Autumn I: 24

Left (Win).

月ぞ澄む里はまことに荒れにけり鶉の床を拂ふ秋風

tsuki zo sumu
sato wa makoto ni
arenikeri
uzura no toko o
harau aki kaze
Clear shines the moon, dwelling
O’er a house truly
Gone to ruin;
The quail’s bed
Brushed by autumn breezes…

Lord Sada’ie.

347

Sada’ie’s poem alludes obliquely to a famous poetic exchange from the Kokinshū, initiated by Ariwara no Narihira.

Right.

繁き野と荒果てにける宿なれや籬の暮に鶉鳴く也

shigeki no to
arehatenikeru
yado nare ya
magaki no kure ni
uzura nakunari
Overgrown are these fields, and
Is that a deserted
Dwelling?
By the fence at evening time
The quails are crying.

Jakuren.

348

Both teams concur that there are no faults at all this round.

Shunzei agrees: ‘Both poems are on the theme of now deserted dwelling places and are equally beautiful in expression, with the Right’s work reminiscent of “Fushimi at evening time”, but this implies a broad vista, and is not “the fence at evening time” too narrow? The Left’s final section is better, and wins, I think.’

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