Tag Archives: summer garb

Autumn I: 5

Left.

秋來ても猶夕風を松が根に夏を忘れし陰ぞたち憂き

aki kitemo
nao yū kaze wo
matsu ga ne ni
natsu o wasureshi
kage zo tachi uki
Though the autumn has come,
Still, for an evening breeze,
Must I abide beneath the pines,
As did I to forget the summer,
Loath to leave the shade…

Lord Sada’ie.

309

Right.

夏衣まだ脱ぎやらぬ夕暮は袖に待たるゝ萩の上風

natsukoromo
mada nugiyaranu
yūgure wa
sode ni mataruru
hagi no uwakaze
My summer garb
Have I not yet put away;
In the evening
My sleeves await
A breeze over the bush-clover.

Jakuren.

310

Neither team can find any fault with the other’s poem.

Shunzei, however, says, ‘With regard to the Right’s poem, one marks the change of clothing at the end of spring into summer, and the passage from autumn and the entrance to winter. Does one say that now it is autumn, one changes from summer clothes? The Left’s ‘beneath the pines’ must win, must it not?’

Summer II: 6

Left (Win).

たち花の匂を風のさそい來て昔にかへす夜半のさ衣

tachibana no
nioi o kaze no
sasoikite
mukashi ni kaesu
yowa no sagoromo
Orange blossom
Scent upon the breeze
Urges
Me back to times gone by,
In my night-time garb…

Lord Ari’ie.

251

Right.

軒近き花たちばなに風過てにほひをのこす蝉の羽衣

noki chikaki
hana tachibana ni
kaze sugite
nioi o nokosu
semi no hagoromo
Close by my eaves
The orange blossom
Brushed by the breeze
Leaves its scent upon
The cicada’s gossamer garb.

Lord Takanobu.

252

The Right team have no particular criticisms to make this round. The Left, however, say that, ‘the expression “the orange blossom brushed by the breeze” (hana tachibana ni kaze sugite) sounds old-fashioned. Furthermore, “cicada’s gossamer garb” (semi no hagoromo) seems somewhat unexpected.’

Shunzei seems to agree, simply saying, ‘The Left’s “urges me back to times gone by, in my night-time garb’ (mukashi ni kaesu yowa no sagoromo) seems particularly fine. It must win.’

Summer II: 5

Left (Tie).

尋入る楢の葉陰の重なりてさてしもかろき夏衣かな

tazuneiru
nara no hakage no
kasanarite
sateshimo karoki
natsugoromo kana
Entering within
The oak leaves’ shade,
Layer upon layer;
Still, how light
Is my summer garb!

Lord Sada’ie.

249

Right (Tie).

花の色の袖は重ねし物なれどひとへに惜しき蝉の羽衣

hana no iro no
sode wa kasaneshi
mono naredo
hitoe ni oshiki
semi no hagoromo
Cherry blossom hued
Sleeves lay one upon the other
And yet now,
A single, deep regret:
For the cicada’s gossamer garb…

The Provisional Master of the Empress’ Household Office.

250

Neither team has any criticisms to make this round.

Shunzei merely remarks, ‘The Left’s poem has “still, how light” (sateshimo karoki) and the Right’s “sleeves lay one upon the other and yet now” (sode wa kasaneshi mono naredo): both of these are only close to the topic, I feel. The round ties.’

Summer II: 4

Left (Win).

重ねても涼しかりけり夏衣うすき袂にやどる月影

kasanetemo
suzushikarikeri
natsugoromo
usuki tamoto ni
yadoru tsukikage
Layered on, yet
‘Tis cool, upon
My summer garb’s
Flimsy sleeves
Rests moonlight.

A Servant Girl.

247

Right.

夏衣へだつともなき袂にも猶よそにこそ風は吹きけれ

natsugoromo
hedatsu mo naki
tamoto ni mo
nao yoso ni koso
kaze wa fukikere
My summer garb
Makes no hindrance
With its sleeves;
Far away is
The breeze a’blowing…

Ietaka.

248

Neither team can find any fault with the other’s poem this round.

Shunzei states, ‘The Left’s poem is perfectly balanced between beginning and end. Thus, it must win.’