Tag Archives: natsugoromo

Summer II: 2

Left (Tie).

脱ぎ代へし蝉の羽衣あつきまでいかになりゆく夏の日數ぞ

nugikaeshi
semi no hagoromo
atsuki made
ikani nariyuku
natsu no hikazu zo
Stripped off to change,
A cicada-silk robe, yet
Why, this heavy hotness
Do I feel?
As the summer days go on…

Lord Kanemune.

243

Right (Tie).

橘のにほひも深し夏衣花ゆへたれかいとひそめけん

tachibana no
nioi mo fukashi
natsugoromo
hana yue tare ka
itoisomeken
Orange blossom
Scent lies thick
Upon my summer garb;
For the cherry blossom’s sake
Should I begin to hate it?

Jakuren.

244

The Right state they find themselves ‘unable to agree’ with the Left’s ‘Why, this heavy heat do I feel?’ (atsuki made ikani nariyuku), while the Left remark that ‘it is perhaps too similar to introduce a poem with “orange blossom” (tachibana) and conclude it with “cherry blossom” (hana).’

Shunzei simply asks, ‘Can the Left’s “do I feel” really be disagreeble? The Right’s “For the cherry blossom’s sake should I begin to hate it?” (hana yue tare ka itoisomeken) recollects the poem on “regret on changing clothes” by Minamoto no Shigeyuki, does it not? Furthermore, it is not implying that summer garb is necessarily fragranced by orange blossom. I question, though,the Left’s use of “heat”. The round should, therefore, tie.’

Summer II: 1

Left (Win).

裏もなき名立ながら夏衣たもとに風はなを隔てけり

ura mo naki
natachinagara
natsugoromo
tamoto ni kaze wa
nao hedatekeri
Unlined
By repute is
Summer garb,
But this sleeve to the wind
Does pose some hindrance.

Kenshō.

241

Right.

夏衣ひとへなれども中なかにあつさぞまさる裏となりける

natsugoromo
hitoe naredomo
nakanaka ni
atsusa zo masaru
ura to narikeru
Summer garb
Is but a single layer, yet
This slight
Heat overpowers
To lie beneath it.

Nobusada.

242

The Right team state that they ‘cannot comprehend the use of “by repute” (natachinagara)’, while the Left counter that they ‘do not understand the use of “slight” (nakanaka ni) before saying that the heat gets under one’s clothing.’

Shunzei responds by stating, ‘The Left’s “by repute” is simply a conventional companion to the statement that summer garb is but a single layer – that is just what one says. It would also seem to suggest the rise of a rumour about an affair, would it not? Nor is there any reason to be puzzled by the Right’s statement of heat beneath one’s clothes; I do wonder, though about “slight” in conjunction with “this heat” (atsusa zo). Thus, even though the rumour in the Left’s poem is unclear, its concluding line is most fine, and it should be the winner.’