Tag Archives: eaves

Summer I: 10

Left.

夏來てぞ野中の庵は荒れまさる窓とぢてけり軒の下草

natsu kite zo
nonaka no io wa
aremasaru
mado tojitekeri
noki no shitagusa
Summer has come, and
Out upon the plains, the hut
Has gone to ruin –
Windows sealed by
Grasses growing ‘neath the eaves.

Lord Ari’ie.

199

Right (Win).

わが宿のよもぎが庭は深し誰分けよとか打ちも拂はん

wa ga yado no
yomogi ga niwa wa
fukashi dare
wakeyo to ka
uchi mo harawan
My dwelling’s
Garden is all overgrown
Deep as deep can be, but
With no-one to force a passage through
I’ll not sweep it back!

Lord Takanobu.

200

The Right have no criticisms to make of the Left’s poem. The Left, though, wonder, ‘What is the meaning of “sweep” (uchiharau) in relation to a garden?’

Shunzei comments: ‘The poems of both Left and Right are superb in configuration and diction [sugata kotoba yū ni haberi]. However, the Left, by saying “gone to ruin” (aremasaru) about a hut on the plains, gives the impression it is talking about the beginning of winter, just after the end of autumn. Furthermore, the poem also gives the impression of being composed on the topic of “Field Lodges” (notei). As for the Right, it is certainly possible to sweep away an overgrown garden, as well as the dust from one’s bed, so I see no problems with this usage. Saying “summer’s deep” is by no means unpleasant. The Right wins.”

Spring II: 21

Left (Tie).

いつとなく思亂れて過ぐる世にうら山しきは遊ぶいとゆふ

itsu to naku
omoimidarete
suguru yo ni
urayamashiki wa
asobu itoyū
Unendingly
Suffering
I pass my time within this world;
How I envy,
The wavering haze…

Kenshō.

101

Right (Tie).

空に知れ春の軒端に遊ぶ糸の思ふ筋なき身の行衛をば

sora ni shire
haru no nokiba ni
asobu ito no
omousujinaki
mi no yukue oba
Learn from the heavens!
Above my eaves in springtime,
Wavering fronds
To my disjointed thoughts
Show the way…

Nobusada.

102

Neither team has anything special to say about the other’s poem.

Shunzei states, ‘Both poems have splendid poetic form on a theme of the poet bewailing his lot. They must tie.’

Spring II: 20

Left (Win).

おぼつかな何ばかりなるいとゆふの軒端に人のながめ分くらん

obotsukana
nani bakari naru
itoyū no
nokiba ni hito no
nagamewakuran
How unclear!
For what, do
The wavering hazes
Along the eaves’ edges folks’
Gaze interrupt?

Lord Kanemune.

99

Right.

佐保姫や霞の衣織りつらん春のみ空に遊ぶいとゆふ

sao hime ya
kasumi no koromo
oritsuran
haru nomi sora ni
asobu itoyū
Has the goddess of Spring
A garb of haze
A’woven?
‘Tis only in the springtime skies, that
The heat haze wavers…

Lord Tsune’ie.

100

Here, the Right say that, ‘it’s unclear what gaze it is the haze is interrupting,’ but the Left have no comments to make.

Shunzei, however, says, ‘It is not the case that there is no reason to say “For what, do the wavering hazes” (nani bakari naru itoyū). The Right’s poem has “A garb of haze a’woven?”. “A’woven” (oritsuran) does not seem to correspond with the conclusion of the verse. In general terms, it’s banal [kotogoto furinitarubeshi]. The Left’s conclusion is somewhat difficult to interpret [kikiwakigataki yō], but in construction the poem is superb [utazama masari].’

SKKS VI: 672

When the Regent and Grand Minister was a Major Councillor, he had this composed on snow upon a mountain hut.

まつ人のふもとのみちはたえぬらんのきばのすぎに雪をもるなり

matsu hito no
fumoto no michi wa
taenuran
nokiba no sugi ni
yuki o moru nari
Awaiting one whose
Path among the foothills
Has vanished, I think;
The cedar by my eaves
Is buried deep in snow.

Sada’ie
定家

SKKS II: 137

Sent to Prince Kore’akira with a sprig of double-flowered cherry blossom she had had picked.

やへにほふのきばのさくらうつろひぬ風よりさきにとふ人もがな

yae niou
nokiba no sakura
utsuroinu
kaze yori saki ni
tou hito mo gana
The double hues
Of cherry beneath my eaves
Have paled;
Before the wind,
I would that you had visited…

Princess Shokushi
式子内親王

SKKS I: 52

A Spring poem, when she offered a hundred-poem sequence.

ながめつるけふはむかしになりぬとものきばのむめはわれをわするな

nagametsuru
kyô wa mukashi ni
narinu tomo
nokiba no mume wa
ware o wasuru na
I turn my gaze on you
Today-and when it is long past –
Even then,
O, plums sheltering ’neath my eaves,
Forget me not!

Princess Shokushi
式子内親王