Tag Archives: Eastern roads

Love X: 9

Left
うかれめの浮かれて歩く旅やかた住みつきがたき恋もする哉

ukareme no
ukarete ariku
tabiyakata
sumitsukigataki
koi mo suru kana
Player girls do
Drift around
The inn-houses;
As unsettled
Is the love they make…

Lord Suetsune
1157

Right (Win)
東路やゆききの人にうちとけて宿かりそめの契すらしも

azumaji ya
yukiki no hito ni
uchitokete
yado karisome no
chigiri sura shimo
Along the Eastern Roads
Folk go back and forth, and
To relieve them, the girls
Find brief lodging and even make brief
Vows of love…

The Supernumerary Master of the Empress’ Household Office
1158

The Right state: the Left’s poem has no matters we can criticize. The Left state: the conception of Love in the Right’s poem is vague.

In judgement: The Left’s poem seem certainly to capture the conceptions of both Love and player-girls. ‘Even’ (sura shimo) in the Right’s final section, sounds rather abrupt and portentous, but the initial section is certainly elegant. Thus, the Right should win.

Love V: 30

Left (Tie).
故郷を出でしにまさる涙かな嵐の枕夢に別れて

furusato ni
ideshi ni masaru
namida kana
arashi no makura
yume ni wakarete
My home
I left in floods
Of tears;
The wild wind round my pillow
Breaks us apart in dreams…

Lord Sada’ie
899

Right.
東路の夜半の眺めを語らなん都の山にかゝる月影

azumaji no
yowa no nagame o
kataranan
miyako no yama ni
kakaru tsukikage
Upon the eastern roads
All night I turn my gaze –
Tell him that,
O moonlight, sinking
Toward the mountains round the capital!

Nobusada
900

Both Left and Right say they find no faults.

In judgement: the Left starts with ‘My home I left in floods’ (furusato ni ideshi ni masaru) and concludes with ‘the wild wind round my pillow breaks us apart in dreams’ (arashi no makura yume ni wakarete) – this is a form of words the quality of which I am entirely unable to convey with my own clumsy expressions, but the Right’s ‘O moonlight, sinking toward the mountains round the capital’ (miyako no yama ni kakaru tsukikage) is awash with a sense of tears, so it is most unclear which should win or lose. Both truly seem to reflect the conception of this topic ‘Love and Travel’ well. The poems have been so good every round that my brush is drenched with this old man’s tears, and I can find no other way to express it.

 

SZS XVIII: 1166

Composed in the conception of travel, when he presented a hundred poem sequence.

東路の野島が埼の浜風に我が紐ゆひし妹がかほのみ面影に見ゆ

azumadi no
nozima ga saki no
Famakaze ni
wa ga Fimo yuFisi
imo ga kaFo nomi
omokage ni miyu
On Eastern roads
At Nojima Point
In the breeze from off the beach:
My belt was tied
By my darling, her face,
A vision, appears before me…

Master of the Left Capital Office, Akisuke
左京大夫顕輔

GSIS XIII: 748

He had been secretly seeing the lady who had been sent to be the Ise Virgin, but when this became known to His Majesty, he put a guard upon her, and it was no longer possible to visit in secret, so he composed.

逢坂は東路とこそきゝしかど心盡しのせきにぞありける

aFusaka Fa
adumadi to koso
kikisikado
kokoro dukusi no
seki ni zo arikeru
Meeting Hill lies
Upon the road to the East
I had heard, and yet
My heart is exhausted by
The barrier here!

Master of the Left Capital Office, Michimasa
左京大夫通雅

GSIS IX: 516

He had accompanied his father to Tōtōmi province, then, after some years had passed, when he was sent to be Governor of Shimotsuke, he composed this at the bridge at Hamana.

東路の浜名の橋を来てみれば昔恋しき渡りなりけり

adumadi no
Famana no Fasi wo
kitemireba
mukasi koFisiki
watarinarikeri
Along eastern roads
To the bridge at Hamana
Have I come and now I see
Sights I loved long ago
Spread out before me…

Ōe no Hirotsune (?-?1089)
大江広経

SKS VI: 184

When Lord Tachibana no Tamenaka left to become Governor of Michinoku, this was presented from pantry of the Grand Empress Dowager, without any mention of who had sent it.

東路のはるけき道を行かへりいつかとくべき下紐の関

adumadi no
Farukeki miti wo
yukikaFeri
ituka tokubeki
sitaFimo no seki
On Eastern paths
So distant
Will you go, and then return
When, indeed, will you undo
The barrier of Shitahimo – my under-belt again?

Anonymous

GSIS I: 3

Composed in the conception of spring having come from the East.

東路は勿来の関もあるものをいかでか春の越えて来つらん

adumadi Fa
nakoso no seki mo
aru mono wo
ikadeka Faru no
koetekituran
Upon the Eastern roads
Come not to the barrier of Nakoso,
They say, so
How is it that Spring
Has crossed to come to here?

Minamoto no Morokata (1035-1081)
源師賢

SIS XVIII: 1198

A certain man came up to the capital from the East and went to the house of woman with whom he had spoken long before; when she asked why he had come to see her in such haste, he said:

おろかにもおもはましかはあづまぢのふせやといひしのべにねなまし

oroka ni mo
omoFamasikaba
adumadi no
Fuseya to iFisi
nobe ni nenamasi
Heedlessly
Had I thought of you
On the Eastern roads,
Upon Fuseya
Plain would I have rather slept!

Anonymous