Tag Archives: mountains

Chūgū no suke shige’ie ason ke uta’awase 96

小笹原夜の間の雪に埋もれてゐなの山風音ぞともしき

ozasawara
yo no ma no yuki ni
uzumorete
ina no yamakaze
oto zo tomoshiki
The groves of young broad-leaved bamboo
In night’s snowfall
Have been buried;
The wind in the Ina mountains
Sounds faint, indeed!

Minamoto no Moromitsu
源師光

Love VII: 1

Left (Tie).
年を經て茂るなげきをこりもせでなど深からん物思ひの山

toshi o hete
shigeru nageki o
kori mo sede
nado fukakaran
mono’omoi no yama
The years go by and
My ever verdant grief
Is never felled;
Why am I so deep
In mountains of gloomy thought?

Kenshō.
961

Right.
君にわれ深く心を筑波山しげきなげきにこりはてぬ哉

kimi ni ware
fukaku kokoro o
tsukubayama
shigeki nageki ni
korihatenu kana
You for me
Had deep thoughts once –
All gone now, yet on Tsukuba Mountain
My ever verdant grief
Remains unfelled…

The Supernumerary Master of the Empress’ Household Office.
962

The Right state: we are not familiar with the expression ‘mountains of gloomy thought’ (mono’omoi no yama) used in the Left’s poem. The Left state: the Right’s poem has nothing significant to say.

In judgement: both poems use the wordplay of ‘ever verdant grief’ (shigeki nageki) and a ‘heart unfelled’ (korinu kokoro); they have no particular merits or faults. The round ties.

Love V: 30

Left (Tie).
故郷を出でしにまさる涙かな嵐の枕夢に別れて

furusato ni
ideshi ni masaru
namida kana
arashi no makura
yume ni wakarete
My home
I left in floods
Of tears;
The wild wind round my pillow
Breaks us apart in dreams…

Lord Sada’ie
899

Right.
東路の夜半の眺めを語らなん都の山にかゝる月影

azumaji no
yowa no nagame o
kataranan
miyako no yama ni
kakaru tsukikage
Upon the eastern roads
All night I turn my gaze –
Tell him that,
O moonlight, sinking
Toward the mountains round the capital!

Nobusada
900

Both Left and Right say they find no faults.

In judgement: the Left starts with ‘My home I left in floods’ (furusato ni ideshi ni masaru) and concludes with ‘the wild wind round my pillow breaks us apart in dreams’ (arashi no makura yume ni wakarete) – this is a form of words the quality of which I am entirely unable to convey with my own clumsy expressions, but the Right’s ‘O moonlight, sinking toward the mountains round the capital’ (miyako no yama ni kakaru tsukikage) is awash with a sense of tears, so it is most unclear which should win or lose. Both truly seem to reflect the conception of this topic ‘Love and Travel’ well. The poems have been so good every round that my brush is drenched with this old man’s tears, and I can find no other way to express it.

 

GSIS III: 231

Composed on seeming like the cool of an autumn evening at Lord Toshitsuna’s house.

夏山の楢の葉そよぐ夕暮はことしも秋の心地こそすれ

natuyama no
nara no Fa soyogu
yuFugure Fa
kotosi mo aki no
kokoti koso sure
In the summer mountains
The oak leaves whisper softly
With the evening:
This year, too, autumn
Feels upon me…

Minamoto no Yoritsuna (1025-1097)
源頼綱

MYS III: 299

A poem composed by Lord Ōtomo, Major Councillor.

奥山の菅の葉しのぎ降る雪の消なば惜しけむ雨な降りそね

okuyama no
suga no pa sinogi
puru yuki no
kenaba wosikemu
ame na puri so ne
Deep within the mountains
The sedge-stalks are weighed down with
Falling snow, but
Should it vanish, how I would regret it, so
Fall not, O rain!

Ōtomo no Yasumaro (?-714)
大伴安麻呂